Giants Of The Tech World Battle

Android Giants Battle: Samsung Note 9 vs Huawei P20 Pro, which one to go for?

Intelligent photography, actual AI processing capabilities and a gorgeous design make Huawei P20 Pro a clear winner

The global smartphone industry has become a battle of the androids. Now with Huawei becoming the number two smartphone vendor globally, surpassing Apple. With the competition getting fierce, let us take a look at two of the biggest flagships out there right now; the Samsung Galaxy Note 9 and Huawei P20 Pro. We will look at four main features that would drive you to buy one phone over the other: Camera, chipset, design of the phone and ultimately value for money.

Intelligent photography

Equipped with Leica Triple Camera, Huawei P20 Pro has a leading rear camera system comprised of a 40MP RGB sensor, 20MP monochrome sensor and an 8MP sensor with telephoto lens. Compared to the Note 9’s 12+12MP dual lens camera, Huawei P20 Pro supports a higher resolution in both its primary and secondary sensors.

 

 

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With AI being the current ‘game changer’ in the world of smartphones right now, it is safe to say that Huawei was the first to do so with their last year’s flagship Mate 10 series. The phone offered real-time scene and object recognition, which is where the phone recognizes the object and scene, and adjusts the camera setting automatically to capture a clear and sharp image. This feature was further developed and improved upon with the launch of their Huawei P20 Pro that came equipped with triple AI cameras. The Samsung Note 9 follows suit with similar features but with ‘AI-based’ technology.

One of the greatest features of Huawei P20 Pro is its low light photography capability, which is equipped with state-of-the-art AI Image Stabilization. Phone users are be able to capture incredible blur-free, handheld shots in low-light using Night Mode, without the need for a tripod. In fact, Huawei P20 Pro’s Night Mode feature can sometimes capture scenes that even the naked eye cannot see.

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Huawei’s current top-of-the-line flagship also supports 3x optical zoom, allowing the Huawei P20 Pro to zoom farther than the Note 9, which only can manage 2x optical zoom. The AI stabilization on the Huawei P20 Pro also comes in useful at digitally zoomed 5x and 10x too.

One SoC to power it all

In order to tailor the device to the needs of different consumers across the world, Huawei has customized its Huawei P20 Pro for different regions. Samsung is doing the same for Note 9, but it has arguably taken a step too far—the Note 9 to be sold in US, LATAM and China will be powered by a Snapdragon 845, while the EMEA models will have Samsung’s proprietary Exynos 9810 SoC embedded within. The two SoCs not just run at different clock speeds and there’s one key component that the Exynos 9810 is sorely missing: a discrete processor for AI tasks.

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According to Qualcomm, the Snapdragon 845’s digital signal processor (DSP) is optimised for AI tasks, similar to the Neural Processing Unit (NPU) inside the Kirin 970 powering the Huawei P20 Series. However, the Exynos 9810 lacks hardware AI support, and instead uses a software alternative. Without the support of a dedicated AI processor, the EMEA model of Note 9 will likely provide a subpar user experience compared to other Note 9 models, as well as the Huawei P20 Pro.

Another score for Huawei P20 Pro with its AI enabled Kirin 970 chipset.

Twilight design

Another important feature we would like to focus on is the physical look and feel of the device and the camera placement.

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While the Samsung Note 9 has launched four colours this year (out of which only 3 are coming to the UAE), the Huawei P20 Pro released and created the trend of the gorgeous gradient coloured bodies. Drawing inspiration from the Northern Lights (Aurora Borelis), Huawei created the unique Twilight purple-to-blue gradient color using the NCVM process, a lengthy industrial.

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Another huge advantage of the P20 Pro body is the placement of the camera sensors. While the Note 9’s sensors are placed on back of the device in a generic vertical format while the Huawei P20 Pro’s sensors have been places horizontally to give the user the camera experience like most compact cameras.

Huawei P20 Pro’s gradient colours and camera placement, makes it a user-friendly and ‘haute’ phone to own and hold.

Value for money

Lastly, which works better for your pocket and gives you the best value for your money?

The Huawei has loaded their devices with long-lasting 4000mAh batteries right through from the Mate 8 to the Mate 9, Mate 9 Pro, Mate 10, Mate 10 Pro and P20 Pro. Samsung finally follows suit with the Note 9 also getting the same treatment.

Considering all the above factors on the Huawei P20 Pro and Samsung Note 9, which are priced at Dh2599 and Dh3699 respectively, the P20 Pro does stand out as a much better deal.  Huawei is offering these premium features at a very competitive price today—while Samsung still needs another few weeks before they can put their new flagship into the hands of consumers.

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Note:

Let me take you back a few years now, back to May 2015. Now I’m not sure what you were doing in may of 15, but while you were doing it, I was sitting down at my computer for the first time, and thinking about online marketing in a serious light, all wide eyed and in awe of how much people were earning from creating their own products from scratch, going from a blank piece of paper, and by their own hand, and through their own ideas, persuading thousands of people to buy their products. Not only that, but by what I was reading, they were really liking the results too. What an amazing skill that would be to have, not just from the sales perspective, but from a creative standpoint too. The pull of this was just too much, and I couldn’t resist. Sounded like a challenge to me. It sounded like that to many other people by the looks of it, because seven months later, December in 15, when I was starting to learn about the high failure rates, and beginning to ask the all important why questions, I remember looking at my contact list packed with people that I’d met, that I’d talked to, and were after the same thing that I was. A do what you want when you want lifestyle. The list wasn’t that huge, maybe twenty five or thirty in total. I found myself asking the question, how many of these people will actually succeed, and end up where they want to be? And how many will either quit before they make it, run out of money, get bored, or decide the whole thing is a scam?
Fast forward to the middle of 2018. Here I still am, so it’s lucky that I was one of the people on that list that did make it. But what happened to the others? Well, let me tell you now that out of the thirty or so people that I’d met in the first nine months of my online marketing, only two of us have made it to the stage where we’re happy with what we’ve done, and succeeded in doing what we set out to do. Only two out of the thirty people on that list went from totally green, knowing nothing at all, to exactly where we wanted to be. Note that I’m only counting the people I met within the first nine months that weren’t already the successes they wanted to be when I met them. So what happened? Where did the other twenty eight people go? Well, most of them quit unfortunately, some because they ran out of money, some because they decided it was all a scam, and some because they were frustrated with the continual contradictory information written in different guides and how to’s. I think that’s really unfortunate, because success is definitely possible. It doesn’t involve luck, it doesn’t involve working for eighteen hours a day on one site. All it depends on is the persons willingness to move forward, and the quality of the information they have showing them how to do so. “I help small businesses and individuals that need to stay in contact with groups, individuals, and clients while maintaining a low budget that is affordable and simple to use over the internet.”

Of course not everyone that hasn’t succeeded yet quit or decided running their own business was a scam, some are still around, and if they haven’t either quit or become successful, they seem to fall into three groups. Group one has allied themselves with the don’t listen to the people making money crew. Now as nice and as lovely as these people might be, or might seem when giving away the earth for nothing, if they don’t know how to do things, and aren’t making money themselves, or don’t have the lifestyle that they want, they shouldn’t be teaching others what they know. No matter how nice they are, how much free stuff they give away, or how many free tips or guides they create, they’re actually doing more harm than good by spreading miss-information. It doesn’t matter how much information you get, if you got five hundred thousand pages worth of stuff for free, if it’s wrong, or un-tested, it’s not going to work no matter how long it is. This is how I always justified pulling anywhere from $250 to $3000 out of my own pocket, my hard earned cash that was earned at some terrible hourly rate working for someone else selling computers and software, to buy other peoples insight and knowledge. It actually turns out that it was experience that gave me the final pieces of the puzzle, which was totally free, but we’ll get to that in a moment.
“I help small businesses and individuals that need to stay in contact with groups, individuals, and clients while maintaining a low budget that is affordable and simple to use over the internet.”
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How Do Emotions and Beliefs Relate

The Relationship Between Emotions and Beliefs

Updated on September 10, 2015
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Dr. Thomas Swan studied cognition and culture at Queen’s University Belfast. His work explores theories of emotion, attention, and memory.

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Beliefs often describe a commitment made in the face of uncertainty. | Source

What are Beliefs?

A belief is an internally held or publicly espoused commitment to a premise that may be knowable or completely unsupported by evidence. Importantly, this gamut of uncertainty is what distinguishes beliefs from knowledge. For example, most of us know and believe that the sky is blue, but if you believe it will rain tomorrow, you do not necessarily know it will rain. Thus, beliefs are often formed when someone ventures beyond the scope of their knowledge, and takes a risk by committing to a premise that may not be entirely supported.

Given the inherent risk, beliefs that are publicly stated often have non-trivial content, i.e. they concern topics that are important for the well-being or social status of the speaker. As a result, beliefs may be imbued with an emotional investment, such that if the belief is proven wrong, there will be an emotional cost.

Many psychologists view belief as an unscientific term that deserves to be phased out. Contradictory and ambiguous definitions may be to blame for this attitude. However, knowledge is even less well defined. For example, a skeptic would claim that we can never know we know anything. If this is the case, then knowledge is merely a well-supported belief that we falsely ascribe the comforting notion of certainty to.

The Purpose of Beliefs

Beliefs may function to advertise your unique characteristics as a mate. The beliefs you hold will distinguish you from other potential partners. This allows like-minded members of the opposite sex to pick you from the crowd, which helps to guarantee a stable relationship in which a child can be brought up successfully. Natural selection should favor extensive belief formation, as this will improve the process of mate selection, and the quality of the child-rearing environment.

How Are Beliefs Learned?

Many of the beliefs we hold have been borrowed from individuals who demonstrate authority or prestige. This includes parents, celebrities, historical figures, politicians, and community leaders. For example, children will overwhelmingly adopt the religious beliefs of their parents. Another natural means of belief adoption is our propensity to conform with the majority.

Ignoring these sources of belief can negatively affect well-being. For example, one could be disowned by their parents, ostracized by society, or destined for failure as a result of choosing maladaptive beliefs. Natural selection has filtered those who are disposed to this behavior from the gene pool, leaving the human race with a disposition for conformity and prestige-based mimicry. An added benefit is the ease with which these types of beliefs are formed. If we assume that the popularity or success of a belief makes it reliable, our mental resources are spared the difficulty of testing it.

Nevertheless, niche beliefs can be attractive if the benefits outweigh the costs. Indeed, if beliefs demonstrate one’s unique characteristics as a mate, then pandering to the majority isn’t always an effective strategy. However, it’s likely that most niche beliefs will be adopted from models of authority or prestige for the aforementioned reasons.

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When forming beliefs, we all like to think we’re perfectly scientific. | Source

How Are Beliefs Formed?

Sometimes a belief will be formed using one’s own cognitive faculties, with little or no influence from other people.

Perhaps the rarest mode of belief formation is that which relies on empirical observation and universal systems of logic to make `rational’ deductions about one’s environment. Not surprisingly, most people claim to exclusively use this method. Indeed, people wish to be seen as impartial because it gives their opinion extra weight. Even if someone has made a rational deduction, accusing them of being irrational will provoke an emotional defense. Thus, it may be impossible to form a belief without the influence of emotion, because even rational beliefs are a source of pride.

A more common form of belief formation is motivated reasoning (PDF). This is often used to reinforce prior beliefs or knowledge that one has an emotional stake in. For example, if a patriot extracts pride from the belief that her country is great, she will be more inclined to believe stories that show her country in a good light. In the same way, religious people are inclined to believe Intelligent Design because it supports prior beliefs that they are emotionally invested in. The purpose is to fool oneself rather than others. Indeed, if a new belief agrees with preexisting beliefs, it appears to be rational, and the motivation for forming it can be ignored.

As well as reinforcing positive emotions, motivated reasoning can be used to cope with negative emotions. For example, sitting in a hospital bed might intensify one’s fear of death. This should create a motivation to believe in an afterlife, prompting a biased search for information that can be used to support the premise. Whether the individual reads holy books and theological articles, or listens to priests and religious groups; the goal is to convince themselves that, if they believed in an afterlife, their belief would be rational. If these mental gymnastics can be performed, the new belief serves to alleviate the negative emotion that triggered the process of motivated reasoning.

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Emotions such as anxiety may be a significant factor in belief formation. | Source

Intuitive and Reflective Beliefs

Cognitive scientists usually separate beliefs into intuitive and reflective states. For example, a man observing a lady smile at her companion’s behavior may form the reflective belief that replicating this behavior would be useful during a romantic encounter. However, this relies on the intuitive belief that a smile is an expression of happiness. Intuitive beliefs are automatically treated as data. They include folk beliefs such as `solid objects cannot occupy the same space’ and `other people have beliefs and desires that are separate from my own’.

Ineraction Between Emotions and Beliefs

Our beliefs influence how we perceive, interpret, and construct the world. As a result, beliefs are central to the production and transformation of emotional states. According to cognitive appraisal theory, emotions are elicited when we evaluate stimuli in our environment. This evaluation includes questions such as “does this stimulus help or inhibit my goals?” and “can i cope with it?”. Negative answers should produce an unpleasant emotion, but if we are to answer these questions, beliefs are required about the nature of the stimulus. For example, feeling anxious during a romantic encounter requires beliefs about how one is expected to behave, and whether one’s behavior matches that ideal. If these beliefs are wrong, one’s emotional state may be unduly affected.

As we have seen, emotions also affect the beliefs we form, suggesting a recurrent interplay between the two cognitions. In fact, some emotions may be especially able to facilitate the formation of new beliefs. For example, anxiety is appraised whenever a non-trivial, uncertain threat to well-being is detected. This describes many of the conditions under which new beliefs form. As such, there should be no greater emotional influence on beliefs than anxiety.

Wishful Thinking?

David Hume described beliefs as perfectly inert states that cannot produce or prevent action. Conversely, pragmatist philosophers have described beliefs as that upon which we are prepared to act. If this is the case, what compels us to act on our beliefs? The deductions made thus far would suggest that if beliefs bias the direction of our behavior, emotions provide the impetus for it.

What we end up believing is invariably what we most want to believe. Though some desirable premises are plausible, many are merely a prelude to wishful thinking. Indeed, if you wish to measure someone’s lack of delusion, just ask them how many unwelcome beliefs they have.

© 2013 Thomas Swan

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